Timeline 191 BC – 220 BC 4th and 5th Syrian War

YearEvents and Comments
Prior:Timeline 161 BC- 190 BC
191 BC191 BC: The Roman calendar, which is four months ahead of the seasons, is adjusted by Lex Acilia de intercalando.

191 BC: The Romans under Manius Acilius Glabrio and Cato the Elder cut the Seleucid king Antiochus III off from his reinforcements in Thrace and outflank his position at the pass of Thermopylae in the Battle of Thermopylae.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
192 BCFulfillment of Daniel 11:18—19
In 192 BC, Antiochus III made his move towards Greece but was soundly defeated a year later at the Battle of Thermopylae. He then resorted to a sea battle to keep the Romans out of his territory, but was again defeated. He called for 70,000 reinforcements. Roman troops under Scipio were half that strength when they met at Magnesia about 50 miles north of Ephesus. But the Roman’s superior military training and tactics so badly defeated Antiochus that he was completely wiped out in a humiliating defeat that led to a complete and total surrender. He had to pay a tribute equivalent to 30 million dollars. He was ruined.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
193 BCFulfillment of Daniel 11:17

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
194 BC
At about the same time as Cleopatra I’s marriage to Ptolemy V in 194/3, her sister Antiochis married Ariarathes of Cappadocia, and Antiochus III attempted to marry another sister, name unknown, to Eumenes of Pergamum, who rejected her (Appian, Syriaca 1.5)

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
195 BC

The Fifth Syrian War
Fulfillment of Dan 11:16
Antiochus III married his daughter Laodice (to Antiochus IV?) in 195 BC (Appian, Syriaca 1.4 — the first incestuous marriage amongst the Seleucids).

195 BC: Battle of Banyais. The Fifth Syrian War ended at the Battle of Banyais, between Antiochus III (King of the Seleucid Empire) and Ptolemy V of Egypt. The Egyptians were defeated by Antiochus’ forces, and were forced to cede all their territory, with the exception of the Sinai Desert, to the Seleucids.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
196 BC204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
197 BC204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
198 BC204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
199 BC199 BC: The Roman law, Lex Porcia, is proposed by the tribune P. Porcius Laeca to give Roman citizens in Italy and provinces the right of appeal in capital cases.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
200 BC 200 BC – The Seleucid Empire deteriorated to half its kingdom and former glory.

200 BC: An object , which appears to be in the form of an airplane, (before airplanes were invented) was found in 1898 in a tomb at Saqquara, Egypt and was later dated as having been created near 200 BC.
http://www.world-mysteries.com/sar_7.htm

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
201 BCPhilip V of Macedon captures Samos and the Egyptian fleet

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
202 BC202 BC: Fifth Syrian War. The Battle of Panion.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
203 BC203 BC: Masinissa▲ becomes king of both the Massyli and the Massaesyli tribes in Numidia and remains a loyal ally to the Romans.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes Pharoah of Egypt
204 BC204 BC: Having lost his alliance with the Numidian chief Masinissa, the Carthaginian general, Hasdrubal Gisco, finds a new ally in the Numidian king Syphax, who marries Sophonisba, Hasdrubal’s daughter, whom until his defection to Rome has been betrothed to Masinissa.

204 BC: The Battle of Crotona is fought between Hannibal’s Carthaginian army, and a Roman force led by Publius Sempronius Tuditanus, with no decisive outcome for either side.

204 BC- 180 BC: Ptolemy V Epiphanes becomes Pharoah July/August 204 to September 180 BC. ▲ After Sosibius, Ptolemy IV’s corrupt minister, had murdered Ptolemy V’s mother, the five-year-old king was officially elevated to the throne; Sosibius became his guardian.
205 BC 221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt dies▼
“The Egyptians and the Greek-Macedonians of Alexandria, exasperated at Agathocles outrages (Ptolemy IV’s friend at court who had manipulated his situation to gain the throne after Ptolemy IV’s death), rose against him. They surrounded the palace in the night, and forced their way in. Agathocles and his sister implored in the most abject manner that their lives might be spared, but in vain. The former was killed by his friends, that he might not be exposed to a more cruel fate. Agathoclea with her sisters, and Oenanthe, their mother, who had taken refuge in a temple, were dragged forth, and in a state of nakedness exposed to the fury of the multitude, who literally tore them limb from limb. All their relations and those who had had any share in the murder of Eurydice were likewise put to death.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agathoclea%5D

“All of them were then handed over together to the mob, and some began to bite them, others to stab them, others to gouge out their eyes. As soon as any of them fell, the body was torn limb from limb until they had mutilated them all” ~Polybius
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/ptolemy4.htm

205 BC – Roman authors write about showers of stones falling from the sky, terrifying local population; Senate orders a conical meteorite known as the Needle of Cybele, worshiped in Asia Minor, be brought to Rome.

205 BC: The worship of the cult of Magna Mater is introduced to Rome from Phrygia. From Phrygia to Rome

In 205 BC, a curious transfer connected two places in the Mediterranean world. In that year, the sacred stone of the cult of the Mother Goddess in Phyrgia (in Anatolia) was fetched by a delegation of Roman ambassadors. They had consulted the Sibylline Books and the oracle of Delphi, and had taken the advice that the Second Punic War against Hannibal would be won if they would bring the Mother Goddess to Rome and let her be welcomed by the virtuous Roman people.

The adoption of Magna Mater must have stunned the inhabitants of Rome. All of a sudden, an oriental cult existed in the midst of their city: the temple of the goddess was installed on the Pallatine. In this temple, Phrygian eunuch priests worshiped the goddess with their oriental rituals, robes and music instruments. On the other hand, the cult was highly Romanized, since Roman rituals en festivals like the Megalensia were also installed to honour Magna Mater.

206 BC206 BC: Antiochus III marches across the Hindu Kush into the Kabul valley and renews a friendship with the Indian king Sophagasenus.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt
207 BC207 BC: The Battle of the Metaurus, fought near the Metaurus River in Umbria, is a pivotal battle during the Second Punic War between Rome and Carthage. The Carthaginians are led by Hannibal’s brother Hasdrubal Barca, and the Roman armies are led by the consuls Marcus Livius Salinator and Gaius Claudius Nero. The Carthaginian army is defeated by the Romans and Hasdrubal is killed in the battle. This major loss by the Carthaginians ends Hannibal’s hopes of success in Italy.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt
208 BC208 BC: The Roman general Marcus Claudius Marcellus is killed in battle while fighting Hannibal inconclusively near Venusia, Apulia.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt
209 BC209 BC: Mete Khan inherits Teoman’s Hun confederations and founds the Xiongnu Empire. The beginning of his rule is accepted as the formation of the first systematic Turkic army. Mete’s forces push into Northern China, threatening the Qin Empire and forcing them to further fortify the Great Wall.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt
210 BC210 BC: Egypt: Arsinoe III, wife and sister of King Ptolemy IV gives birth to the future Ptolemy V Epiphanes. Thereafter, she is sequestered in the palace, while Ptolemy’s depraved male and female favourites run and ruin both the king and his government of Egypt. Although Arsinoe III disapproves of the sordid state of the court, she is unable to exert any influence.

210 BC: The famine and inflation facing Rome is eased with the pacification by the Romans of Sicily.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharaoh of Egypt
211 BC211 BC: Arsaces II ▲succeeds his father Arsaces I ▼as King of Parthia.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
212 BC212 BC: Antiochia, the sister of Antiochus III, has her husband Xerxes of Armenia assassinated.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
213 BC213 BC: Emperor Qin Shi Huang orders all Confucian writings destroyed.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
214 BC214 BC: Roman legions led by Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus defeat Hanno’s Carthaginian forces in a battle near Beneventum, thus denying Hannibal much needed reinforcements.

214 BC “At Hadria an altar was seen in the sky and about it the forms of men in white clothes.” – Julius Obsequens, Prodigiorum Libellus, Ch. 66

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
215 BC215 BC: Philip V of Macedon and Hannibal negotiate an alliance under which they pledge mutual support and defence. Specifically, they agree to support each other against Rome,

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
216 BC216 BC: A revolt of the Egyptian peasants is put down by Ptolemy IV.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
217 BCFulfillment of Dan 11:10-11 Spring 217: Battle of Raphia (Polybius 5.79 etc.) Antiochus III attacks Ptolemy IV but is defeated in humiliation. The largest battle since the Battle of Ipses. Antiochus III is humiliated by his defeat at the Battle of Raphia against an incapable ruler, in spite of now having Ptolemy’s defected general Theodotus.

217 BC “At Faleri the sky had seemed to be rent as it were with a great fissure and through the opening a bright light had shone.” – Livy, History, Book XXII, Ch. 1

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
218 BCWinter 218-217: Antiochus wintered in Ptolemais (Polybius 5.71.12).

Spring 218: Renewal of the campaign of war (Polybius 5.68).

218 BC Rome: Glowing lamps were seen in the sky at Praeneste, a shield was observed at Arpi and in the Amiterno district, the sky was all on fire, and men in white garments appear.

218 BC: Hannibal crosses the Alps “We will either find a way…or make one.” to engage the Roman army.

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt
219 BCWinter 219-218: Antiochus besieged Dura (Polybius 5.66).

The Forth Syrian War: Spring 219: Antiochus begun the war against Ptolemy IV (Polybius 5.58).

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt

The first foreign surgeon to practice in Rome arrives in the city.
220 BCWinter 220-219: Antiochus spent the winter in his capital (Polybius 5.57).

221 BC – 205 BC: Ptolemy IV Pharoah of Egypt

Winter 221-220: Antiochus, fighting Molon, wintered in Antioch of Migdonia (Polybius 5.51).
Cont.Click here for Timeline 221 BC -250 BC
191 BC – 220 BC

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