Timeline 251 BC – 280 BC 1st and 2nd Syrian War

YearEvents and Comments
Prior:Timeline 221 BC – 250 BC
251 BC
Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
252 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
253 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins.
Battle of Cos in 258 BC makes Ptolemy’s navy toast. Syria wins. Antiochus gains ground A peace agreement is made which includes the marriage of Ptolemy’s II daughter, Berenice Phernophorus, to Antiochus II Theos. There is only one problem: Antiochus II Theos is already married to Laodice. He has to divorce Laodice to marry Berenice Phernophorus. this enrages Laodice. (253 BC – Marriage of Antiochus II to Berenice Syra Phernophorus. Antiochus II repudiated his previous wife, Laodice, and turned over substantial domain to her.) Daniel 11:6

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
254 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 7

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
255 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 6

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
256 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 5

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
257 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 4

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
258 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 3

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
259 BC260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr 2

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
260 BC 260 BC -253 BC: the Second Syrian War. Syria Wins. Yr. 1

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
261 BC261 BC Antiochus I dies.▼ Succeeded by Antiochus II

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
262 BCSeleucid king Antiochus I’s eldest son Seleucus, who has ruled in the east of the kingdom as viceroy for a number of years, is put to death by his father on the charge of rebellion.

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
263 BCThe first sundial is brought to Rome from Sicily.

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
264 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
265 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
266 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
267 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
268 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
269 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
270 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
271 BC274 BC-271 BC: The First Syrian War. Egypt Wins.
Antiochus tries but goes bye-bye because Egypt Wins! The First Syrian War was a major victory for the Ptolemies. Antiochus took the Ptolemaic controlled areas in coastal Syria and southern Anatolia in his initial rush. Ptolemy re-conquered these territories by 271 BC. The fighting between the Syrians (Antiochus’) and Egyptians (Ptolemys) as told in the prophecies of Daniel chapter 11.

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
272 BC274 BC-271 BC: The First Syrian War. Egypt Wins. Yr 3

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
273 BC274 BC-271 BC: The First Syrian War. Egypt Wins. Yr 2

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
274 BC274 BC-271 BC: The First Syrian War. Egypt Wins. Yr 1

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
275 BC275 BC: A tablet dated 275 BC states that the inhabitants of Babylon were transported to Seleucia, where a palace was built, as well as a temple given the ancient name of Esagila. With this deportation, the history of Babylon comes practically to an end, though more than a century later, it was found that sacrifices were still performed in its old sanctuary.
By 141 BC Babylon was in complete desolation and obscurity…as prophesied. (Jeremiah 51:1 , Jeremiah 51:54, Isaiah 13:1, Isaiah 14:4, Isaiah 14:22 )

275 BC – Berosus’ History of Babylonia claims that pilgrims journey up Ararat to carve amulets from the petrified pitch that covers the Ark of Noah.

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
276 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
277 BCThe earliest the Septuagint would have been translated and the Jews given their freedom in Egypt under Ptolomy II

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
278 BC278 BC, Ptolemy II married his full sister Arsinoe who was eight years his senior (and who had previously been married to Lysimachus). She had a reputation for mischief, convincing Lysimachus to kill his son by a former marriage, causing him an unpopular opinion among the people. It brought upon them whispering and the subject of humor by the sharp-tongued poet named “Sotades”, who became known for his obscene satirical poems and credited with being the inventor of the Palidrome. As punishment, the poet was first imprisoned, and then encased in a lead box and thrown into the sea.
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/ptolemy2.htm

278 BC: Ptolemy II married his sister after deposing of his first wife, who also happened to be named Arsinoe. This created a scandal in the Greek society which earned him the name “Philadelphus” or “sister-lover.” It was incest, a scandal of the highest order.
It brought upon them whispering and the subject of humor by the sharp-tongued poet named “Sotades”, who became known for his obscene satirical poems and credited with being the inventor of the Palidrome.
‘You are pushing the prong into an unholy fleshpot,’ wrote the sharp-tongued poet.
As punishment, the poet was first imprisoned, and then encased in a lead box and thrown into the sea.
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/ptolemy2.htm

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
279 BC279 BC: Balkans: Scordisci Celts found a city called Singidon (Roman Singidunum) which is today the Serbian city of Belgrade.

Ptolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
280 BCPtolemy II 285–246 BC Pharaoh of Egypt
Cont.Click here for Timeline 281 BC -310 BC
Timeline 251 BC – 280 BC

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: